11 January 2011

Variety vs Production


Something I learned last season is that a city garden designed for food production is pretty boring. We thought we wanted to plant a lot of a few things because it would allow us to put the excess by and eat from the garden through the winter. In some ways our strategy was a success, but without the variety to go along with it, we find ourselves wanting more of what we don't have.

We're putting together our seed order and the list is pretty long. Granted, there will be far more seeds than what could ever fit in our garden; but thankfully I'll be able to donate some to my school's community garden. To satisfy the volume lost, Meg has already set us up with a CSA that runs for a good portion of the year—and they also have eggs.

The garden will look different and hopefully it will invigorate our growing and eating inventiveness.

5 comments:

Era said...

Lovely, I can't wait to see what you plant.

Cowtown Carrie said...

I just purchased a book by Rosalind Creasy called 'Edible Landscaping' It's all about incorporating your gardening with your landscaping....it's lovely and I think you might like it.

hak said...

In the photo, I'm assuming the large structure is for tomatoes. What is the advantage of the A-frame when it comes to tomatoes? Also, what plants are growing in the small structure in the right bed?

Kelly said...

@ Era- I've trimmed down the schedule since Jude has joined us so I should be back in the posting saddle soon.

@ Cowtown- Thanks for the reference. Meg and I are always looking for new material to add to the garden library.

@ hak- Yes the large trellis is for tomatoes and I need to do a post on why the cons outweigh the pros—stay tuned. The plants on the smaller contraption are peas. That too was a failed vertical structure. We are trying a lot of new things with our city garden, some things work and others...

hak said...

Kelly, I appreciate the engineering tests when it comes to trellis structures. I've tried a few different ones that have failed as well. I've seen quite a few tomato trellises similar to yours and now you have me curious as to the cons. It seems like it would be the most stable. Another option I've seen, but not tried, is the rebar grid that you can buy from the local Home Depot/Lowes. It seems rather ugly to me, but would also seem to lack the inherit stability of the A frame.